↓ Skip to main content

Systematic review of models assessing the economic value of routine varicella and herpes zoster vaccination in high-income countries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Systematic review of models assessing the economic value of routine varicella and herpes zoster vaccination in high-income countries
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1861-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oliver Damm, Bernhard Ultsch, Johannes Horn, Rafael T. Mikolajczyk, Wolfgang Greiner, Ole Wichmann

Abstract

A systematic review was conducted to assess the cost-effectiveness of routine varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) vaccination in high-income countries estimated by modelling studies. A PubMed search was performed to identify relevant studies published before October 2013. Studies were included in the review if they (i) evaluated the cost-effectiveness of routine childhood or adolescent varicella vaccination and/or HZ vaccination targeting the elderly, and if they (ii) reported results for high-income countries. A total of 38 model-based studies were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Routine childhood or adolescent varicella vaccination was cost-effective or cost-saving from a payer perspective and always cost-saving from a societal perspective when ignoring its potential impact on HZ incidence due to reduced or absent exogenous boosting. The inclusion of the potential impact of childhood varicella vaccination on HZ led to net quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) losses or incremental cost-effectiveness ratios exceeding commonly accepted thresholds. Additional HZ vaccination could partially mitigate this effect. Studies focusing only on the evaluation of HZ vaccination reported a wide range of results depending on the selected target age-group and the vaccine price, but most found HZ vaccination to be a cost-effective or marginally cost-effective intervention. Cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination was strongly dependent on the age at vaccination, the price of the vaccine, the assumed duration of protection and the applied cost per QALY threshold. While HZ vaccination is mostly considered cost-effective, cost-effectiveness of varicella vaccination primarily depends on the in- or exclusion of exogenous boosting in the model. As a consequence, clarification on the role of exogenous boosting is crucial for decision-making regarding varicella vaccination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 91 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 27%
Student > Master 21 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 6 6%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 17 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 28%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,134,018
of 22,953,506 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,400
of 14,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,966
of 267,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#42
of 227 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,953,506 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,958 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,298 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 227 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.