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Maternal anemia is a potential risk factor for anemia in children aged 6–59 months in Southern Africa: a multilevel analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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133 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal anemia is a potential risk factor for anemia in children aged 6–59 months in Southern Africa: a multilevel analysis
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5568-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter A. M. Ntenda, Owen Nkoka, Paul Bass, Thomas Senghore

Abstract

The effect of maternal anemia on childhood hemoglobin status has received little attention. Thus, we examined the potential association between maternal anemia and childhood anemia (aged 6-59 months) from selected Southern Africa countries. A cross-sectional study using nationally representative samples of children aged 6-59 months from the 2010 Malawi, 2011 Mozambique, 2013 Namibia, and 2010-11 Zimbabwe demographic and health surveys (DHS) was conducted. Generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) were constructed to test the associations between maternal anemia and childhood anemia, controlling for individual and community sociodemographic covariates. The GLMMs showed that anemic mothers had increased odds of having an anemic child in all four countries; adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 1.69 and 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.37-2.13) in Malawi, (aOR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.37-2.13) in Mozambique, (aOR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.08-2.22) in Namibia, and (aOR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.25-1.84) in Zimbabwe. Furthermore, the odds of having an anemic child was higher in communities with a low percentage of anemic mothers (aOR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.19-1.94) in Mozambique. Despite the long-standing efforts to combat childhood anemia, the burden of this condition is still rampant and remains a significant problem in Southern Africa. Thus, public health strategies aimed at reducing childhood anemia should focus more on addressing infections, and micronutrient deficiencies both at individual and community levels in Southern Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 133 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 17%
Student > Master 19 14%
Researcher 14 11%
Lecturer 9 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 6%
Other 22 17%
Unknown 38 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 20%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Unspecified 4 3%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 48 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2022.
All research outputs
#5,938,346
of 21,301,913 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,340
of 13,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,048
of 299,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,301,913 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,795 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them