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Maternal omega-3 fatty acids regulate offspring obesity through persistent modulation of gut microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal omega-3 fatty acids regulate offspring obesity through persistent modulation of gut microbiota
Published in
Microbiome, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0476-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruairi C. Robertson, Kanakaraju Kaliannan, Conall R. Strain, R. Paul Ross, Catherine Stanton, Jing X. Kang

Abstract

The early-life gut microbiota plays a critical role in host metabolism in later life. However, little is known about how the fatty acid profile of the maternal diet during gestation and lactation influences the development of the offspring gut microbiota and subsequent metabolic health outcomes. Here, using a unique transgenic model, we report that maternal endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) production during gestation or lactation significantly reduces weight gain and markers of metabolic disruption in male murine offspring fed a high-fat diet. However, maternal fatty acid status appeared to have no significant effect on weight gain in female offspring. The metabolic phenotypes in male offspring appeared to be mediated by comprehensive restructuring of gut microbiota composition. Reduced maternal n-3 PUFA exposure led to significantly depleted Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroides, and Akkermansia and higher relative abundance of Clostridia. Interestingly, offspring metabolism and microbiota composition were more profoundly influenced by the maternal fatty acid profile during lactation than in utero. Furthermore, the maternal fatty acid profile appeared to have a long-lasting effect on offspring microbiota composition and function that persisted into adulthood after life-long high-fat diet feeding. Our data provide novel evidence that weight gain and metabolic dysfunction in adulthood is mediated by maternal fatty acid status through long-lasting restructuring of the gut microbiota. These results have important implications for understanding the interaction between modern Western diets, metabolic health, and the intestinal microbiome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Student > Master 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 7 6%
Other 21 19%
Unknown 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Other 24 22%
Unknown 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 124. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2021.
All research outputs
#215,210
of 19,148,527 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#57
of 1,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,275
of 293,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,148,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,465 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them