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A cut-off of daily sedentary time and all-cause mortality in adults: a meta-regression analysis involving more than 1 million participants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
77 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
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Title
A cut-off of daily sedentary time and all-cause mortality in adults: a meta-regression analysis involving more than 1 million participants
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1062-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Po-Wen Ku, Andrew Steptoe, Yung Liao, Ming-Chun Hsueh, Li-Jung Chen

Abstract

The appropriate limit to the amount of daily sedentary time (ST) required to minimize mortality is uncertain. This meta-analysis aimed to quantify the dose-response association between daily ST and all-cause mortality and to explore the cut-off point above which health is impaired in adults aged 18-64 years old. We also examined whether there are differences between studies using self-report ST and those with device-based ST. Prospective cohort studies providing effect estimates of daily ST (exposure) on all-cause mortality (outcome) were identified via MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases until January 2018. Dose-response relationships between daily ST and all-cause mortality were examined using random-effects meta-regression models. Based on the pooled data for more than 1 million participants from 19 studies, the results showed a log-linear dose-response association between daily ST and all-cause mortality. Overall, more time spent in sedentary behaviors is associated with increased mortality risks. However, the method of measuring ST moderated the association between daily ST and mortality risk (p < 0.05). The cut-off of daily ST in studies with self-report ST was 7 h/day in comparison with 9 h/day for those with device-based ST. Higher amounts of daily ST are log-linearly associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in adults. On the basis of a limited number of studies using device-based measures, the findings suggest that it may be appropriate to encourage adults to engage in less sedentary behaviors, with fewer than 9 h a day being relevant for all-cause mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 77 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 190 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 16%
Student > Bachelor 27 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Researcher 13 7%
Other 29 15%
Unknown 54 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 32 17%
Sports and Recreations 26 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 13%
Psychology 10 5%
Computer Science 4 2%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 71 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 94. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2022.
All research outputs
#358,645
of 22,050,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#285
of 3,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,960
of 301,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,050,620 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,241 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them