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Prospective cohort study of the relationship between neuro-cognition, social cognition and violence in forensic patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

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158 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Prospective cohort study of the relationship between neuro-cognition, social cognition and violence in forensic patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0548-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken O’Reilly, Gary Donohoe, Ciaran Coyle, Danny O’Sullivan, Arann Rowe, Mairead Losty, Tracey McDonagh, Lasairiona McGuinness, Yvette Ennis, Elizabeth Watts, Louise Brennan, Elizabeth Owens, Mary Davoren, Ronan Mullaney, Zareena Abidin, Harry G Kennedy

Abstract

There is a broad literature suggesting that cognitive difficulties are associated with violence across a variety of groups. Although neurocognitive and social cognitive deficits are core features of schizophrenia, evidence of a relationship between cognitive impairments and violence within this patient population has been mixed. We prospectively examined whether neurocognition and social cognition predicted inpatient violence amongst patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder (n = 89; 10 violent) over a 12 month period. Neurocognition and social cognition were assessed using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB). Using multivariate analysis neurocognition and social cognition variables could account for 34 % of the variance in violent incidents after controlling for age and gender. Scores on a social cognitive reasoning task (MSCEIT) were significantly lower for the violent compared to nonviolent group and produced the largest effect size. Mediation analysis showed that the relationship between neurocognition and violence was completely mediated by each of the following variables independently: social cognition (MSCEIT), symptoms (PANSS Total Score), social functioning (SOFAS) and violence proneness (HCR-20 Total Score). There was no evidence of a serial pathway between neurocognition and multiple mediators and violence, and only social cognition and violence proneness operated in parallel as significant mediators accounting for 46 % of the variance in violent incidents. There was also no evidence that neurocogniton mediated the relationship between any of these variables and violence. Of all the predictors examined, neurocognition was the only variable whose effects on violence consistently showed evidence of mediation. Neurocognition operates as a distal risk factor mediated through more proximal factors. Social cognition in contrast has a direct effect on violence independent of neurocognition, violence proneness and symptom severity. The neurocognitive impairment experienced by patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders may create the foundation for the emergence of a range of risk factors for violence including deficits in social reasoning, symptoms, social functioning, and HCR-20 risk items, which in turn are causally related to violence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 155 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 16%
Student > Master 23 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 11%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 31 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 55 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 16%
Neuroscience 11 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 40 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,467,468
of 21,689,971 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,161
of 4,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,814
of 245,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,689,971 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them