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Explaining the slow transition of child-appropriate dosage formulations from the global to national level in the context of Uganda: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, July 2015
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Title
Explaining the slow transition of child-appropriate dosage formulations from the global to national level in the context of Uganda: a qualitative study
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40545-015-0039-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xavier Nsabagasani, Ebba Hansen, Anthony Mbonye, Freddie Ssengooba, Herbert Muyinda, James Mugisha, Jasper Ogwal-Okeng

Abstract

In 2007, the Sixtieth World Health Assembly (WHA) passed a resolution entitled "Better medicines for children" and subsequently the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the inclusion of child-appropriate dosage formulations in the essential medicines lists of member countries. However, child-appropriate dosage formulations are not highlighted in the Essential Medicines and Health Supplies List of Uganda (EMHSLU) 2012 and they are still limited in availability in public health facilities. Several stakeholders influenced the status of child-appropriate dosage formulations in the EMHSLU 2012. To explore stakeholders' views about the relevance of the globally recommended child-appropriate dosage formulations in the context of Uganda. The findings derive from thirty three in-depth interviews with stakeholder representatives and the results of a follow up validation meeting where preliminary findings were shared with stakeholders. Policy analysis and policy transfer theories were used to guide a deductive analysis for manifest and latent content. According to stakeholders, the transition to the globally recommended child-appropriate dosage formulations has been slow in Uganda due to a number of factors. These factors include resource constraints at the global and national levels, lack of Ministry of Health (MOH) formal commitment to the adoption of the child-appropriate dosage formulations policy and a lack of consensus between those who advocated for the availability of liquid oral dosage formulations for easy administration and effectiveness and those who were more convinced by economic arguments and preferred the procurement of solid oral dosage formulations intended for adults. The global policy for child-appropriate dosage formulations still remains to be implemented in Uganda and other low income countries. This has been due to lack of resources that hindered formal transfer of the policy from the global to the local level. To achieve this transfer there is a need for resource mobilisation at both the international and local levels, together with the revitalisation of UMTAC to enable it to take on a leadership role of the coalitions supporting child-appropriate dosage formulations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Master 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Librarian 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 9 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 6 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,671,462
of 5,382,699 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#54
of 81 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,277
of 186,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,382,699 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them