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Altered protease and antiprotease balance during a COPD exacerbation contributes to mucus obstruction

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Altered protease and antiprotease balance during a COPD exacerbation contributes to mucus obstruction
Published in
Respiratory Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12931-015-0247-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shashi Chillappagari, Jenni Preuss, Sebastian Licht, Christian Müller, Poornima Mahavadi, Gaurav Sarode, Claus Vogelmeier, Andreas Guenther, Lutz Nahrlich, Bruce K. Rubin, Markus O. Henke

Abstract

Proteases have been shown to degrade airway mucin proteins and to damage the epithelium impairing mucociliary clearance. There are increased proteases in the COPD airway but changes in protease-antiprotease balance and mucin degradation have not been investigated during the course of a COPD exacerbation. We hypothesized that increased protease levels would lead to mucin degradation in acute COPD exacerbations. We measured neutrophil elastase (NE) and alpha 1 protease inhibitor (A1-PI) levels using immunoblotting, and conducted protease inhibitor studies, zymograms, elastin substrate assays and cigarette smoke condensate experiments to evaluate the stability of the gel-forming mucins, MUC5AC and MUC5B, before and 5-6 weeks after an acute pulmonary exacerbation of COPD (n = 9 subjects). Unexpectedly, mucin concentration and mucin stability were highest at the start of the exacerbation and restored to baseline after 6 weeks. Consistent with these data, immunoblots and zymograms confirmed decreased NE concentration and activity and increased A1-PI at the start of the exacerbation. After recovery there was an increase in NE activity and a decrease in A1-PI levels. In vitro, protease inhibitor studies demonstrated that serine proteases played a key role in mucin degradation. Mucin stability was further enhanced upon treating with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). There appears to be rapid consumption of secreted proteases due to an increase in antiproteases, at the start of a COPD exacerbation. This leads to increased mucin gel stability which may be important in trapping and clearing infectious and inflammatory mediators, but this may also contribute acutely to mucus retention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2016.
All research outputs
#2,843,855
of 12,538,284 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#311
of 1,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,250
of 231,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#4
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,284 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,448 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.