↓ Skip to main content

Effect of Fagonia Arabica (Dhamasa) on in vitro thrombolysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, November 2007
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
75 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Effect of Fagonia Arabica (Dhamasa) on in vitro thrombolysis
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, November 2007
DOI 10.1186/1472-6882-7-36
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sweta Prasad, Rajpal Singh Kashyap, Jayant Y Deopujari, Hemant J Purohit, Girdhar M Taori, Hatim F Daginawala

Abstract

Atherothrombotic diseases such as myocardial or cerebral infarction are serious consequences of the thrombus formed in blood vessels. Thrombolytic agents are used to dissolve the already formed clots in the blood vessels; however, these drugs have certain limitations which cause serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Herbal preparations have been used since ancient times for the treatment of several diseases. Herbs and their components possessing antithrombotic activity have been reported before; however, herbs that could be used for thrombolysis has not been reported so far. This study's aim was to investigate whether herbal preparations (aqueous extract) possess thrombolytic activity or not. An in vitro thrombolytic model was used to check the clot lysis effect of six aqueous herbal extracts viz., Tinospora cordifolia, Rubia cordifolia, Hemidesmus indicus, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn, Fagonia Arabica and Bacopa monnieri Linn along with Streptokinase as a positive control and water as a negative control. Using an in vitro thrombolytic model, Tinospora cordifolia, Rubia cordifolia, Hemidesmus indicus, Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn, Fagonia Arabica and Bacopa monnieri Linn showed 19.3%, 14.5%, 20.3%, 17.8%, 75.6% and 41.8% clot lysis respectively . Among the herbs studied Fagonia arabica showed significant % of clot lysis (75.6%) with reference to Streptokinase (86.2%). Through our study it was found that Dhamasa possesses thrombolytic properties that could lyse blood clots in vitro; however, in vivo clot dissolving properties and active component(s) of Dhamasa for clot lysis are yet to be discovered. Once found Dhamasa could be incorporated as a thrombolytic agent for the improvement of patients suffering from Atherothrombotic diseases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 3 3%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 111 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Master 16 14%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 4%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 26 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 25 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 9%
Chemistry 6 5%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 27 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2015.
All research outputs
#10,995,497
of 12,373,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#2,065
of 2,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,081
of 234,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,511 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,514 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.