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Preventing preterm birth with progesterone: costs and effects of screening low risk women with a singleton pregnancy for short cervical length, the Triple P study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2011
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
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Title
Preventing preterm birth with progesterone: costs and effects of screening low risk women with a singleton pregnancy for short cervical length, the Triple P study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-11-77
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melanie A van Os, Jeanine A van der Ven, C Emily Kleinrouweler, Eva Pajkrt, Esteriek de Miranda, Aleid van Wassenaer, Martina Porath, Patrick M Bossuyt, Kitty WM Bloemenkamp, Christine Willekes, Mallory Woiski, Martijn A Oudijk, Katia M Bilardo, Marko J Sikkema, Johannes J Duvekot, Diederik Veersema, Jacqueline Laudy, Petra Kuiper, Christianne JM de Groot, Ben Willem J Mol, Monique C Haak

Abstract

Women with a short cervical length in mid-trimester pregnancy have a higher risk of preterm birth and therefore a higher rate of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Progesterone can potentially decrease the number of preterm births and lower neonatal mortality and morbidity. Previous studies showed good results of progesterone in women with either a history of preterm birth or a short cervix. However, it is unknown whether screening for a short cervix and subsequent treatment in mid trimester pregnancy is effective in low risk women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 3%
Australia 2 2%
United States 1 1%
Peru 1 1%
Unknown 87 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 18%
Student > Master 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Other 8 9%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Psychology 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2012.
All research outputs
#7,817,832
of 13,559,312 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,697
of 2,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,974
of 108,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#47
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,559,312 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.