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Effect of adjusting the combination of budesonide/formoterol on the alleviation of asthma symptoms

Overview of attention for article published in Asthma Research and Practice, May 2018
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Title
Effect of adjusting the combination of budesonide/formoterol on the alleviation of asthma symptoms
Published in
Asthma Research and Practice, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40733-018-0043-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryosuke Souma, Kumiya Sugiyama, Hiroyuki Masuda, Hajime Arifuku, Kentaro Nakano, Hiroyoshi Watanabe, Tomoshige Wakayama, Shingo Tokita, Masamitsu Tatewaki, Hideyuki Satoh, Kenya Koyama, Yumeko Hayashi, Fumiya Fukushima, Hirokuni Hirata, Masafumi Arima, Kazuhiro Kurasawa, Takeshi Fukuda, Yasutsugu Fukushima

Abstract

The combination of budesonide + formoterol (BFC) offers the advantages of dose adjustment in a single inhaler according to asthma symptoms. We analyzed the relationship between asthma symptoms in terms of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and dose adjustment by the patient. Twenty-eight patients with asthma who used BFC for alleviation of their symptoms (12 men, 16 women; 60 years old) were instructed that the inhaled BFC dose could be increased to a maximum of 8 inhalations per day according to symptom severity. Patients measured and recorded PEF every morning and evening in their asthma diary along with their symptoms and the dose of drugs taken. Sixteen of the 28 patients increased their dose for asthma symptoms. The time to recovery from the asthma symptoms was significantly shorter when cough was the only symptom present compared with dyspnea or wheeze (1.4 vs. 5.3 or 6.6 days, p < 0.05) and when they had only one symptom compared with two or three symptoms (1.3 vs. 5.7 or 10.5, p < 0.01). The relationship between PEF (% of personal best) when the dose was increased (Y) and the days for the increased dose to achieve a PEF greater than PEF in the symptom-free state (X) was determined to be Y = - 0.591X + 89.2 (r2 = 0.299, p < 0.001). As a guide for increasing the BFC dose when patients with mild asthma have asthma symptoms, the dose should be increased when cough is present or PEF is decreased to 88.9% (i.e., X = 0.5).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,954,179
of 13,010,971 outputs
Outputs from Asthma Research and Practice
#41
of 45 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,886
of 271,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Asthma Research and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 45 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one scored the same or higher as 4 of them.
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