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Design of a study to determine the impact of insecticide resistance on malaria vector control: a multi-country investigation

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
221 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Design of a study to determine the impact of insecticide resistance on malaria vector control: a multi-country investigation
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0782-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Immo Kleinschmidt, Abraham Peter Mnzava, Hmooda Toto Kafy, Charles Mbogo, Adam Ismail Bashir, Jude Bigoga, Alioun Adechoubou, Kamaraju Raghavendra, Tessa Bellamy Knox, Elfatih M Malik, Zinga José Nkuni, Nabie Bayoh, Eric Ochomo, Etienne Fondjo, Celestin Kouambeng, Herman Parfait Awono-Ambene, Josiane Etang, Martin Akogbeto, Rajendra Bhatt, Dipak K Swain, Teresa Kinyari, Kiambo Njagi, Lawrence Muthami, Krishanthi Subramaniam, John Bradley, Philippa West, Achile Massougbodji, Mariam Okê-Sopoh, Aurore Hounto, Khalid Elmardi, Neena Valecha, Luna Kamau, Evan Mathenge, Martin James Donnelly

Abstract

Progress in reducing the malaria disease burden through the substantial scale up of insecticide-based vector control in recent years could be reversed by the widespread emergence of insecticide resistance. The impact of insecticide resistance on the protective effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets (ITN) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) is not known. A multi-country study was undertaken in Sudan, Kenya, India, Cameroon and Benin to quantify the potential loss of epidemiological effectiveness of ITNs and IRS due to decreased susceptibility of malaria vectors to insecticides. The design of the study is described in this paper. Malaria disease incidence rates by active case detection in cohorts of children, and indicators of insecticide resistance in local vectors were monitored in each of approximately 300 separate locations (clusters) with high coverage of malaria vector control over multiple malaria seasons. Phenotypic and genotypic resistance was assessed annually. In two countries, Sudan and India, clusters were randomly assigned to receive universal coverage of ITNs only, or universal coverage of ITNs combined with high coverage of IRS. Association between malaria incidence and insecticide resistance, and protective effectiveness of vector control methods and insecticide resistance were estimated, respectively. Cohorts have been set up in all five countries, and phenotypic resistance data have been collected in all clusters. In Sudan, Kenya, Cameroon and Benin data collection is due to be completed in 2015. In India data collection will be completed in 2016. The paper discusses challenges faced in the design and execution of the study, the analysis plan, the strengths and weaknesses, and the possible alternatives to the chosen study design.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Sudan 1 <1%
Unknown 218 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 47 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 18%
Researcher 33 15%
Student > Bachelor 19 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 33 15%
Unknown 42 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 3%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 50 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,658,899
of 22,817,213 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,216
of 5,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,079
of 263,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#22
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,817,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,563 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.