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Transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation in “de novo” patients with migraine without aura: the first Italian experience

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Headache & Pain, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 728)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation in “de novo” patients with migraine without aura: the first Italian experience
Published in
Journal of Headache & Pain, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s10194-015-0551-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonio Russo, Alessandro Tessitore, Francesca Conte, Laura Marcuccio, Alfonso Giordano, Gioacchino Tedeschi

Abstract

Transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation (tSNS) has been recently found superior to sham stimulation for episodic migraine prevention in a randomized trial. We evaluated both the safety and efficacy of a brief period of tSNS in a group of patients with migraine without aura (MwoA). We enrolled 24 consecutive patients with MwoA experiencing a low frequency of attacks, which had never taken migraine preventive drugs in the course of their life. Patients performed a high frequency tSNS and were considered "compliant" if they used the tSNS for ≥ 2/3 of the total time expected. For this reason, four patients were excluded from the final statistical analysis. Primary outcome measures were the reduction migraine attacks and migraine days per month (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we evaluated the percentage of patients having at least 50 % reduction of monthly migraine attacks and migraine days. Secondary outcome measures were the reduction of headache severity during migraine attacks and HIT-6 (Headache Impact Test) rating as well as in monthly intake of rescue medication (p < 0.05). Finally, compliance and satisfaction to treatment and potential adverse effects related to tSNS have been evaluated. Between run-in and second month of tSNS treatment, both primary and secondary endpoints were met. Indeed, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the frequency of migraine attacks (p < 0.001) and migraine days (p < 0.001) per month. We also demonstrated at least 50 % reduction of monthly migraine attacks and migraine days in respectively 81 and 75 % of patients. Furthermore, a statistically significant reduction in average of pain intensity during migraine attacks (p = 0.002) and HIT-6 rating (p < 0.001) and intake of rescue medication (p < 0.001) has been shown. All patients showed good compliance levels and no relevant adverse events. In patients experiencing a low frequency of attacks, significant improvements in multiple migraine severity parameters were observed following a brief period of high frequency tSNS. Therefore, tSNS may be considered a valid option for the preventive treatment of migraine attacks in patients who cannot or are not willing to take daily medications, or in whom low migraine frequency and/or intensity would not require pharmacological preventive therapies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Ethiopia 1 1%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 17%
Other 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 23 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 23%
Neuroscience 8 11%
Psychology 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 25 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2016.
All research outputs
#317,319
of 12,229,156 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Headache & Pain
#20
of 728 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,699
of 238,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Headache & Pain
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,229,156 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 728 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.