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The decline of malaria in Vietnam, 1991–2014

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
The decline of malaria in Vietnam, 1991–2014
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2372-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra M. Goldlust, Phung Duc Thuan, Dang Duy Hoang Giang, Ngo Duc Thang, Guy E. Thwaites, Jeremy Farrar, Ngo Viet Thanh, Tran Dang Nguyen, Bryan T. Grenfell, Maciej F. Boni, Tran Tinh Hien

Abstract

Despite the well-documented clinical efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) against malaria, the population-level effects of ACT have not been studied thoroughly until recently. An ideal case study for these population-level effects can be found in Vietnam's gradual adoption of artemisinin in the 1990s. Analysis of Vietnam's national annual malaria reports (1991-2014) revealed that a 10% increase in artemisinin procurement corresponded to a 32.8% (95% CI 27.7-37.5%) decline in estimated malaria cases. There was no consistent national or regional effect of vector control on malaria. The association between urbanization and malaria was generally negative and sometimes statistically significant. The decline of malaria in Vietnam can largely be attributed to the adoption of artemisinin-based case management. Recent analyses from Africa showed that insecticide-treated nets had the greatest effect on lowering malaria prevalence, suggesting that the success of interventions is region-specific. Continuing malaria elimination efforts should focus on both vector control and increased access to ACT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 19 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 21 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2022.
All research outputs
#2,432,103
of 22,620,502 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#553
of 5,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,146
of 301,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,620,502 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,528 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them