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RNA-sequencing elucidates the regulation of behavioural transitions associated with the mating process in honey bee queens

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
RNA-sequencing elucidates the regulation of behavioural transitions associated with the mating process in honey bee queens
Published in
BMC Genomics, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1750-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabio Manfredini, Mark J F Brown, Vanina Vergoz, Benjamin P Oldroyd

Abstract

Mating is a complex process, which is frequently associated with behavioural and physiological changes. However, understanding of the genetic underpinnings of these changes is limited. Honey bees are both a model system in behavioural genomics, and the dominant managed pollinator of human crops; consequently understanding the mating process has both pure and applied value. We used next-generation transcriptomics to probe changes in gene expression in the brains of honey bee queens, as they transition from virgin to mated reproductive status. In addition, we used CO2-narcosis, which induces oviposition without mating, to isolate the process of reproductive maturation. The mating process produced significant changes in the expression of vision, chemo-reception, metabolic, and immune-related genes. Differential expression of these genes maps clearly onto known behavioural and physiological changes that occur during the transition from being a virgin queen to a newly-mated queen. A subset of these changes in gene expression were also detected in CO2-treated queens, as predicted from previous physiological studies. In addition, we compared our results to previous studies that used microarray techniques across a range of experimental time-points. Changes in expression of immune- and vision-related genes were common to all studies, supporting an involvement of these groups of genes in the mating process. Our study is an important step in understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating post-mating behavioural transitions in a natural system. The weak overlap in patterns of gene expression with previous studies demonstrates the high sensitivity of genome-wide approaches. Thus, while we build on previous microarray studies that explored post-mating changes in honey bees, the broader experimental design, use of RNA-sequencing, and focus on Australian honey bees, which remain free from the devastating parasite Varroa destructor, in the current study, provide unique insights into the biology of the mating process in honey bees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 30%
Student > Master 13 18%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 19%
Environmental Science 5 7%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 15 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,105,723
of 12,378,687 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,833
of 7,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,381
of 242,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#62
of 237 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,687 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,251 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 237 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.