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Genetic instability in the tumor microenvironment: a new look at an old neighbor

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer, July 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic instability in the tumor microenvironment: a new look at an old neighbor
Published in
Molecular Cancer, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12943-015-0409-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonio Palumbo, Nathalia de Oliveira Meireles Da Costa, Martin Hernan Bonamino, Luis Felipe Ribeiro Pinto, Luiz Eurico Nasciutti

Abstract

The recent exponential increase in our knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis has largely failed to translate into new therapies and clinical practices. This lack of success may result in part from the fact that most studies focus on tumor cells as potential therapeutic targets and neglect the complex microenvironment that undergoes profound changes during tumor development. Furthermore, an unfortunate association of factors such as tumor genetic complexity, overestimation of biomarker and drug potentials, as well as a poor understanding of tumor microenvironment in diagnosis and prognosis leads to the current levels of treatment failure regarding a vast majority of cancer types. A growing body of evidence points to the importance of the functional diversity of immune and structural cells during tumor development. In this sense, the lack of technologies that would allow for molecular screening of individual stromal cell types poses a major challenge for the development of therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. Progress in microenvironment genetic studies represents a formidable opportunity for the development of new selective drugs because stromal cells have lower mutation rates than malignant cells, and should prove to be good targets for therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 2 2%
India 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 78 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 25%
Student > Master 10 12%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 12%
Engineering 5 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 13 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2020.
All research outputs
#10,654,421
of 16,649,395 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer
#734
of 1,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,187
of 236,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,649,395 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,674 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them