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The ethnobotanical domain of the Swat Valley, Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2018
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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43 Mendeley
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Title
The ethnobotanical domain of the Swat Valley, Pakistan
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13002-018-0237-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kishwar Ali, Nasrullah Khan, Inayat-Ur Rahman, Waqar Khan, Murad Ali, Nisar Uddin, Mohammad Nisar

Abstract

This study contributes to the current ethnomedicinal knowledge of the Swat Valley, Pakistan. District Swat possesses remarkable biodiversity owing to its varied topographical and climatic conditions, prompting a distinct human-plant association. Our hypothesis is that the presence of such a great biodiversity has shaped into a formal ethnobotanical culture in the area transmitted through generations. We suspect that the versatility of some plant species has greater influence on the culture. Therefore, the prime objective of the study is to understand this unique human-plant relationship in the valley and to create scientific roots for the selection and practice of herbs in the ethnobotanical domain of the district. Primary data were collected using questionnaires and face-to-face interviews with the locals. The data collected were used for calculating some important indices, i.e. relative frequency of citation (RFC), participant agreement ratio (PAR), frequency of citation (FC), Smith's Salience Index (SI), Relative Importance Index (RII), Cultural Value Index (CVI) and a newly proposed, Ali's Conservation Priority Index (CPI). Index scores were used as key identifier of the ethnobotanically important plants of the area. Residents of the Swat Valley have listed plant uses in 15 use categories. Around 9% of the respondents have a common consensus on the selection and use of plants for the treatment of evil eye with similar results for body cuts (8.2%) followed by psychological/neural ailments (8.0%). Respondents agree that Berberis lyceum Royle. dominates in all five indices. Skimmia laureola Franch. also constitutes one of the central plants of the ethnobotanical domain, ranking second in the SI, fifth in the RII, seventh in CVI, and third in the Cultural Importance Index. It holds the thirty-fifth position in the CPI. Over 80% of the population treat different diseases with herbal remedies. In the common ethnobotanical domain of the area, plants like Mentha longifolia L., Berberis lyceum, and Skimmia laureola are very important and have high salience and importance values, thus suggesting these plants are versatile for their uses in the study area. In conclusion, only some plant species are prioritised for their use in the ethnobotanical domain of the community. Medicinal and aromatic plant (MAP) usage is widespread in the Swat Valley. The ethnobotanical knowledge could be used as a tool to understand the adaptability of a specific taxon in the area and the possible conservation risk to their existence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 16 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 23%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 21 49%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,546,714
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#358
of 576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,979
of 270,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,349 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.