↓ Skip to main content

Epigenome-wide association study reveals decreased average methylation levels years before breast cancer diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 1,134)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
23 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Epigenome-wide association study reveals decreased average methylation levels years before breast cancer diagnosis
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0104-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karin van Veldhoven, Silvia Polidoro, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Carlotta Sacerdote, Salvatore Panico, Amalia Mattiello, Domenico Palli, Giovanna Masala, Vittorio Krogh, Claudia Agnoli, Rosario Tumino, Graziella Frasca, Kirsty Flower, Ed Curry, Nicholas Orr, Katarzyna Tomczyk, Michael E. Jones, Alan Ashworth, Anthony Swerdlow, Marc Chadeau-Hyam, Eiliv Lund, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Torkjel M. Sandanger, James M. Flanagan, Paolo Vineis

Abstract

Interest in the potential of DNA methylation in peripheral blood as a biomarker of cancer risk is increasing. We aimed to assess whether epigenome-wide DNA methylation measured in peripheral blood samples obtained before onset of the disease is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. We report on three independent prospective nested case-control studies from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Italy; n = 162 matched case-control pairs), the Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC; n = 168 matched pairs), and the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS; n = 548 matched pairs). We used the Illumina 450k array to measure methylation in the EPIC and NOWAC cohorts. Whole-genome bisulphite sequencing (WGBS) was performed on the BGS cohort using pooled DNA samples, combined to reach 50× coverage across ~16 million CpG sites in the genome including 450k array CpG sites. Mean β values over all probes were calculated as a measurement for epigenome-wide methylation. In EPIC, we found that high epigenome-wide methylation was associated with lower risk of breast cancer (odds ratio (OR) per 1 SD = 0.61, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.80; -0.2 % average difference in epigenome-wide methylation for cases and controls). Specifically, this was observed in gene bodies (OR = 0.51, 95 % CI 0.38-0.69) but not in gene promoters (OR = 0.92, 95 % CI 0.64-1.32). The association was not replicated in NOWAC (OR = 1.03 95 % CI 0.81-1.30). The reasons for heterogeneity across studies are unclear. However, data from the BGS cohort was consistent with epigenome-wide hypomethylation in breast cancer cases across the overlapping 450k probe sites (difference in average epigenome-wide methylation in case and control DNA pools = -0.2 %). We conclude that epigenome-wide hypomethylation of DNA from pre-diagnostic blood samples may be predictive of breast cancer risk and may thus be useful as a clinical biomarker.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 128 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 16%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 27 20%
Unknown 23 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 19%
Computer Science 4 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 2%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 26 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2021.
All research outputs
#744,702
of 20,947,122 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#27
of 1,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,726
of 248,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,947,122 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,134 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.