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Trauma/hemorrhagic shock instigates aberrant metabolic flux through glycolytic pathways, as revealed by preliminary 13C-glucose labeling metabolomics

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

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Title
Trauma/hemorrhagic shock instigates aberrant metabolic flux through glycolytic pathways, as revealed by preliminary 13C-glucose labeling metabolomics
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0612-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angelo D’Alessandro, Annie L Slaughter, Erik D Peltz, Ernest E Moore, Christopher C Silliman, Matthew Wither, Travis Nemkov, Anthony W Bacon, Miguel Fragoso, Anirban Banerjee, Kirk C Hansen

Abstract

Metabolic derangement is a key hallmark of major traumatic injury. The recent introduction of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics technologies in the field of trauma shed new light on metabolic aberrations in plasma that are triggered by trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Alteration in metabolites associated with catabolism, acidosis and hyperglycemia have been identified. However, the mechanisms underlying fluxes driving such metabolic adaptations remain elusive. A bolus of U-(13)C-glucose was injected in Sprague-Dawley rats at different time points. Plasma extracts were analyzed via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect quantitative fluctuations in metabolite levels as well as to trace the distribution of heavy labeled carbon isotopologues. Rats experiencing trauma did not show major plasma metabolic aberrations. However, trauma/hemorrhagic shock triggered severe metabolic derangement, resulting in increased glucose levels, lactate and carboxylic acid accumulation. Isotopologue distributions in late Krebs cycle metabolites (especially succinate) suggested a blockade at complex I and II of the electron transport chain, likely due to mitochondrial uncoupling. Urate increased after trauma and hemorrhage. Increased levels of unlabeled mannitol and citramalate, metabolites of potential bacterial origin, were also observed in trauma/hemorrhagic shock rats, but not trauma alone or controls. These preliminary results are consistent with observations we have recently obtained in humans, and expand upon our early results on rodent models of trauma and hemorrhagic shock by providing the kinetics of glucose fluxes after trauma and hemorrhage. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, owing to the limited number of biological replicates, results highlight a role for shock, rather than trauma alone, in eliciting systemic metabolic aberrations. This study provides the foundation for tracing experiments in rat models of trauma. The goal is to improve our understanding of substrate specific metabolic derangements in trauma/hemorrhagic shock, so as to design resuscitative strategies tailored toward metabolic alterations and the severity of trauma.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Croatia 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 34%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Professor 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Engineering 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 9 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2022.
All research outputs
#6,554,974
of 22,094,926 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#985
of 3,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,654
of 250,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,094,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,308 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them