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The unique distribution of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 in parasite isolates with short and long latent periods from the Republic of Korea

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2015
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Title
The unique distribution of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 in parasite isolates with short and long latent periods from the Republic of Korea
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0803-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Youn-Kyoung Goo, Jun-Hye Moon, So-Young Ji, Dong-Il Chung, Yeonchul Hong, Shin-Hyung Cho, Won-Ja Lee, Jung-Yeon Kim

Abstract

Vivax malaria occurring in the Republic of Korea is occasionally characterized by a long latent infection induced by hypnozoites in the liver. So far, the mechanisms responsible for short and long latent infections of vivax malaria are not known. Therefore, the present study classified the parasite isolates according to the long and short latent periods and then analysed the genetic diversity of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP-1). Blood samples containing P. vivax isolates were collected from 465 patients from 2011 to 2013 at health centers in the Republic of Korea. PvMSP-1 gene sequences were analysed in groups classified by the collection year, and short or long latent periods. The samples in short and long latent periods were selected by the timing of vivax malaria occurrence, July-August and January-May, respectively. Three PvMSP-1 types (Sal-1, Belem, and recombinant) were observed in P. vivax isolates collected from 2011 to 2013. Interestingly, the recombinant and Sal-1 types were dominant in vivax malaria of the long and short latent periods, respectively. In addition, the S-b like subtype of the PvMSP-1 Sal-1 type was first identified in 2013. This study revealed that the genetic type of PvMSP-1 is likely related to the duration of its latent period. Moreover, trends of the genetic types of PvMSP-1 seem to be stable in recent years compared with those of previous years in which various new types were observed.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 29%
Student > Bachelor 3 21%
Researcher 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Computer Science 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Materials Science 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,609,604
of 5,450,695 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,589
of 2,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,229
of 190,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#88
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,450,695 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,173 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,014 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.