↓ Skip to main content

Treating tobacco dependence in older adults: a survey of primary care clinicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Treating tobacco dependence in older adults: a survey of primary care clinicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice
Published in
BMC Family Practice, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0317-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Huddlestone, Gemma Michelle Walker, Robana Hussain-Mills, Elena Ratschen

Abstract

The benefits of smoking cessation among older people are well documented. Despite this, evidence suggests that older smokers are rarely engaged in smoking cessation efforts, and that existing tobacco dependence treatments require further tailoring to the specific needs of older smokers. This study assesses the knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice of primary care clinicians in relation to addressing tobacco dependence among older people. A cross-sectional survey of 427 NHS primary care clinicians in a large English city was conducted using modified version of a previously validated questionnaire. One hundred and seventy one clinicians (40 % response rate) completed the survey. While the majority (90.0 %) of respondents reported enquiring regularly about older patients' smoking status, just over half (59.1 %) reported providing older patients with smoking cessation support. A lack of awareness in relation to the prevalence and impact of smoking in later life were apparent: e.g. only 47 % of respondents were aware of that approximately 10 life years are lost due to smoking related disease, and only 59 % knew that smoking can reduce the effectiveness of medication prescribed for conditions common in later life. Self-reported attendance at smoking-related training was significantly associated with proactive clinical practice. There is a need to improve clinicians' knowledge, in relation to smoking and smoking cessation in older patients and to build clinician confidence in seizing teachable moments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 4 8%
Other 11 23%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Psychology 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 14 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2015.
All research outputs
#14,821,227
of 22,821,814 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,253
of 1,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,340
of 264,036 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#39
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,821,814 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,856 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,036 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.