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Gestational weight gain information: seeking and sources among pregnant women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2015
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Title
Gestational weight gain information: seeking and sources among pregnant women
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0600-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane C. Willcox, Karen J. Campbell, Elizabeth A. McCarthy, Martha Lappas, Kylie Ball, David Crawford, Alexis Shub, Shelley A. Wilkinson

Abstract

Promoting healthy gestational weight gain (GWG) is important for preventing obstetric and perinatal morbidity, along with obesity in both mother and child. Provision of GWG guidelines by health professionals predicts women meeting GWG guidelines. Research concerning women's GWG information sources is limited. This study assessed pregnant women's sources of GWG information and how, where and which women seek GWG information. Consecutive women (n = 1032) received a mailed questionnaire after their first antenatal visit to a public maternity hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Recalled provision of GWG guidelines by doctors and midwives, recalled provided GWG goals, and the obtaining of GWG information and information sources were assessed. Participants (n = 368; 35.7 % response) averaged 32.5 years of age and 20.8 weeks gestation, with 33.7 % speaking a language other than English. One in ten women recalled receiving GWG guidelines from doctors or midwives, of which half were consistent with Institute of Medicine guidelines. More than half the women (55.4 %) had actively sought GWG information. Nulliparous (OR 7.07, 95 % CI = 3.91-12.81) and obese (OR 1.96, 95 % CI = 1.05-3.65) women were more likely to seek information. Underweight (OR 0.29, 95 % CI = 0.09-0.97) women and those working part time (OR 0.52, 95 % CI = 0.28-0.97) were less likely to seek information. Most frequently reported GWG sources included the internet (82.7 %), books (55.4 %) and friends (51.5 %). The single most important sources were identified as the internet (32.8 %), general practitioners (16.9 %) and books (14.9 %). More than half of women were seeking GWG guidance and were more likely to consult non-clinician sources. The small numbers given GWG targets, and the dominance of non-clinical information sources, reinforces that an important opportunity to provide evidence based advice and guidance in the antenatal care setting is currently being missed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 103 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Researcher 7 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 7%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 29 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 18%
Psychology 9 9%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Arts and Humanities 4 4%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 24 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,129,844
of 8,071,305 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,399
of 1,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,285
of 228,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#63
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,071,305 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.