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Replication independent DNA double-strand break retention may prevent genomic instability

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer, March 2010
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Title
Replication independent DNA double-strand break retention may prevent genomic instability
Published in
Molecular Cancer, March 2010
DOI 10.1186/1476-4598-9-70
Pubmed ID
Authors

Narisorn Kongruttanachok, Chutipa Phuangphairoj, Araya Thongnak, Wanpen Ponyeam, Prakasit Rattanatanyong, Wichai Pornthanakasem, Apiwat Mutirangura

Abstract

Global hypomethylation and genomic instability are cardinal features of cancers. Recently, we established a method for the detection of DNA methylation levels at sites close to endogenous DNA double strand breaks (EDSBs), and found that those sites have a higher level of methylation than the rest of the genome. Interestingly, the most significant differences between EDSBs and genomes were observed when cells were cultured in the absence of serum. DNA methylation levels on each genomic location are different. Therefore, there are more replication-independent EDSBs (RIND-EDSBs) located in methylated genomic regions. Moreover, methylated and unmethylated RIND-EDSBs are differentially processed. Euchromatins respond rapidly to DSBs induced by irradiation with the phosphorylation of H2AX, gamma-H2AX, and these initiate the DSB repair process. During G0, most DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining repair (NHEJ), mediated by at least two distinct pathways; the Ku-mediated and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated. The ATM-mediated pathway is more precise. Here we explored how cells process methylated RIND-EDSBs and if RIND-EDSBs play a role in global hypomethylation-induced genomic instability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
India 1 2%
Unknown 38 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Lecturer 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Unspecified 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2011.
All research outputs
#7,833,005
of 12,483,518 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer
#572
of 1,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,636
of 106,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,483,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,055 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.