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Short-Term Anesthesia Inhibits Formalin-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) Activation in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex but Not in the Spinal Cord

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, August 2015
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Title
Short-Term Anesthesia Inhibits Formalin-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) Activation in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex but Not in the Spinal Cord
Published in
Molecular Pain, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0052-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keri K Tochiki, Maria Maiarù, James R C Miller, Stephen P Hunt, Sandrine M Géranton

Abstract

The rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) has been implicated in the negative affective response to injury, and importantly, it has been shown that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the rACC contributes to the full expression of the affective component of pain in rodents. In this study, we investigated whether administration of anesthesia at the time of injury could reduce phosphorylated-ERK (PERK) expression in the rACC, which might eliminate the negative affective component of noxious stimulation. Intraplantar hindpaw formalin stimulation, an aversive event in the awake animal, was given with or without general isoflurane anesthesia, and PERK expression was subsequently quantified in the rACC using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, as numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of spinal ERK signaling in the regulation of nociceptive behaviour, we also examined PERK in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Formalin injection with and without short-term (<10 min) general isoflurane anesthesia induced the same level of PERK expression in spinal cord laminae I-II. However, PERK expression was significantly inhibited across all laminae of the rACC in animals anesthetized during formalin injection. The effect of anesthesia was such that levels of PERK were the same in formalin and sham treated anesthesized animals. This study is the first to demonstrate that isoflurane anesthesia can inhibit formalin-induced PERK in the rACC and therefore might eliminate the unpleasantness of restraint associated with awake hindpaw injection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 38%
Student > Postgraduate 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 23%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 15%
Neuroscience 2 15%
Unknown 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#11,167,461
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#406
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,655
of 234,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#34
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.