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Testing the feasibility of eliciting preferences for health states from adolescents using direct methods

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Testing the feasibility of eliciting preferences for health states from adolescents using direct methods
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12887-018-1179-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Trafford Crump, Ryan Lau, Elizabeth Cox, Gillian Currie, Julie Panepinto

Abstract

Measuring adolescents' preferences for health states can play an important role in evaluating the delivery of pediatric healthcare. However, formal evaluation of the common direct preference elicitation methods for health states has not been done with adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to test how these methods perform in terms of their feasibility, reliability, and validity for measuring health state preferences in adolescents. This study used a web-based survey of adolescents, 18 years of age or younger, living in the United States. The survey included four health states, each comprised of six attributes. Preferences for these health states were elicited using the visual analogue scale, time trade-off, and standard gamble. The feasibility, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of each of these preference elicitation methods were tested and compared. A total of 144 participants were included in this study. Using a web-based survey format to elicit preferences for health states from adolescents was feasible. A majority of participants completed all three elicitation methods, ranked those methods as being easy, with very few requiring assistance from someone else. However, all three elicitation methods demonstrated weak test-retest reliability, with Kendall's tau-a values ranging from 0.204 to 0.402. Similarly, all three methods demonstrated poor construct validity, with 9-50% of all rankings aligning with our expectations. There were no significant differences across age groups. Using a web-based survey format to elicit preferences for health states from adolescents is feasible. However, the reliability and construct validity of the methods used to elicit these preferences when using this survey format are poor. Further research into the effects of a web-based survey approach to eliciting preferences for health states from adolescents is needed before health services researchers or pediatric clinicians widely employ these methods.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 35%
Other 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 19%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Computer Science 1 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 11 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,872,104
of 19,446,267 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#744
of 2,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,650
of 291,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,446,267 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them