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Xist localization and function: new insights from multiple levels

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
138 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
286 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Xist localization and function: new insights from multiple levels
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13059-015-0733-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea Cerase, Greta Pintacuda, Anna Tattermusch, Philip Avner

Abstract

In female m ammals, one of the two X chromosomes in each cell is transcriptionally silenced in order to achieve dosage compensation between the genders in a process called X chromosome inactivation. The master regulator of this process is the long non-coding RNA Xist. During X-inactivation, Xist accumulates in cis on the future inactive X chromosome, triggering a cascade of events that provoke the stable silencing of the entire chromosome, with relatively few genes remaining active. How Xist spreads, what are its binding sites, how it recruits silencing factors and how it induces a specific topological and nuclear organization of the chromatin all remain largely unanswered questions. Recent studies have improved our understanding of Xist localization and the proteins with which it interacts, allowing a reappraisal of ideas about Xist function. We discuss recent advances in our knowledge of Xist-mediated silencing, focusing on Xist spreading, the nuclear organization of the inactive X chromosome, recruitment of the polycomb complex and the role of the nuclear matrix in the process of X chromosome inactivation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 286 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Unknown 282 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 25%
Student > Bachelor 49 17%
Student > Master 45 16%
Researcher 39 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 3%
Other 37 13%
Unknown 36 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 124 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 28%
Neuroscience 6 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 2%
Other 23 8%
Unknown 40 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,942,305
of 22,824,164 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2,193
of 4,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,756
of 263,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#42
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,824,164 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,115 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.