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Type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic risk may be associated with increase in DNA methylation of FKBP5

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic risk may be associated with increase in DNA methylation of FKBP5
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0513-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin Ortiz, Joshua J. Joseph, Richard Lee, Gary S. Wand, Sherita Hill Golden

Abstract

Subclinical hypercortisolism and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cardiovascular disease, and metabolic dysfunction. Intronic methylation of FKBP5 has been implicated as a potential indicator of chronic cortisol exposure. Our overall objective in this study was to determine the association of chronic cortisol exposure, measured via percent methylation of FKBP5 at intron 2, with percent glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol), waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), in a clinic-based sample of 43 individuals with T2DM. Greater percent methylation of the FKBP5 intron 2 at one CpG-dinucleotide region was significantly associated with higher HbA1c (β = 0.535, p = 0.003) and LDL cholesterol (β = 0.344, p = 0.037) and a second CpG-dinucleotide region was significantly associated with higher BMI and WC (β = 0.516, p = 0.001; β = 0.403, p = 0.006, respectively). FKBP5 methylation may be a marker of higher metabolic risk in T2DM, possibly secondary to higher exposure to cortisol. Further work should aim to assess the longitudinal association of FKBP5 with cardiovascular disease and glycemic outcomes in T2DM as a first step in understanding potential preventive and treatment-related interventions targeting the HPA axis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Other 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 15 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 15 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2018.
All research outputs
#3,751,509
of 18,757,439 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#253
of 1,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,274
of 288,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,757,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them