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Improving child survival through a district management strengthening and community empowerment intervention: early implementation experiences from Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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106 Mendeley
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Title
Improving child survival through a district management strengthening and community empowerment intervention: early implementation experiences from Uganda
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2129-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Ruhweza Katahoire, Dorcus Kiwanuka Henriksson, Eric Ssegujja, Peter Waiswa, Florence Ayebare, Danstan Bagenda, Anthony K. Mbonye, Stefan Swartling Peterson

Abstract

The Community and District Empowerment for Scale-up (CODES) project pioneered the implementation of a comprehensive district management and community empowerment intervention in five districts in Uganda. In order to improve effective coverage and quality of child survival interventions CODES combines UNICEF tools designed to systematize priority setting, allocation of resources and problem solving with Community dialogues based on Citizen Report Cards and U-Reports used to engage and empower communities in monitoring health service provision and to demand for quality services. This paper presents early implementation experiences in five pilot districts and lessons learnt during the first 2 years of implementation. This qualitative study was comprised of 38 in-depth interviews with members of the District Health Teams (DHTs) and two implementing partners. These were supplemented by observations during implementation and documents review. Thematic analysis was used to distill early implementation experiences and lessons learnt from the process. All five districts health teams with support from the implementing partners were able to adopt the UNICEF tools and to develop district health operational work plans that were evidence-based. Members of the DHTs described the approach introduced by the CODES project as a more systematic planning process and very much appreciated it. Districts were also able to implement some of the priority activities included in their work plans but limited financial resources and fiscal decision space constrained the implementation of some activities that were prioritized. Community dialogues based on Citizen Report Cards (CRC) increased community awareness of available health care services, their utilization and led to discussions on service delivery, barriers to service utilization and processes for improvement. Community dialogues were also instrumental in bringing together service users, providers and leaders to discuss problems and find solutions. The dialogues however are more likely to be sustainable if embedded in existing community structures and conducted by district based facilitators. U report as a community feedback mechanism registered a low response rate. The UNICEF tools were adopted at district level and generally well perceived by the DHTs. The limited resources and fiscal decision space however can hinder implementation of prioritized activities. Community dialogues based on CRCs can bring service providers and the community together but need to be embedded in existing community structures for sustainability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 3 3%
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the 1 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Unknown 101 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 23%
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 25 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 21%
Social Sciences 22 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 29 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2019.
All research outputs
#1,831,484
of 15,519,312 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,195
of 10,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,511
of 240,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,519,312 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,709 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them