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Acute necrotizing pneumonia combined with parapneumonic effusion caused by Mycobacterium lentiflavum: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
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Title
Acute necrotizing pneumonia combined with parapneumonic effusion caused by Mycobacterium lentiflavum: a case report
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1100-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yong Chul Lee, Seung Bum Kim, Su Jin Gang, Seung Yong Park, So Ri Kim

Abstract

Mycobacterium lentiflavum (M. lentiflavum), a slow growing nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM), has recently been described as an emerging human pathogen regardless of the immune status of the host. Previous reports have demonstrated that cervical lymphadenitis of children is the most frequent pathology of M. lentiflavum. However, there are little reports regarding pulmonary diseases by M. lentiflavum specifically in immunocompetent patients. A 60-year-old man having prolonged productive cough and dyspnea with fever was initially diagnosed as pneumonia with parapneumonic effusion. Imaging studies showed that the radiologic abnormality was acute bronchopneumonic infiltration with abscess formation in the left lower lobe and parapneumonic pleural effusion. M. lentiflavum was identified in the cultured pleural tissues. On the basis of these findings, he was diagnosed as pulmonary infection and pleurisy caused by M. lentiflavum, which was treated with a combination of antibiotics covering NTM. His clinical manifestations were dramatically improved by the treatment targeting NTM, while those were refractory to empirical antibiotic therapy. In this report, we introduce the isolation of M. lentiflavum from pleural tissues associated with acute necrotizing pneumonia combined with parapneumonic effusion in an immunocompetent host, suggesting that the M. lentiflavum can be a human pathogen invovled in pulmonary infectious diseases and pleurisy with poor response to empirical antibiotic treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 24%
Researcher 3 12%
Librarian 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Other 8 32%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,640,415
of 5,565,912 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,709
of 2,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,012
of 192,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#143
of 147 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.