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Contribution of the non-effector members of the HrpL regulon, iaaL and matE, to the virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in tomato plants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, August 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Contribution of the non-effector members of the HrpL regulon, iaaL and matE, to the virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in tomato plants
Published in
BMC Microbiology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0503-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melissa G. Castillo-Lizardo, Isabel M. Aragón, Vivian Carvajal, Isabel M. Matas, María Luisa Pérez-Bueno, María-Trinidad Gallegos, Matilde Barón, Cayo Ramos

Abstract

The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is widely distributed among plant-associated bacteria. Certain strains of the Pseudomonas syringae complex can further metabolize IAA into a less biologically active amino acid conjugate, 3-indole-acetyl-ε-L-lysine, through the action of the iaaL gene. In P. syringae and Pseudomonas savastanoi strains, the iaaL gene is found in synteny with an upstream gene, here called matE, encoding a putative MATE family transporter. In P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000, a pathogen of tomato and Arabidopsis plants, the HrpL sigma factor controls the expression of a suite of virulence-associated genes via binding to hrp box promoters, including that of the iaaL gene. However, the significance of HrpL activation of the iaaL gene in the virulence of Pto DC3000 is still unclear. A conserved hrp box motif is found upstream of the iaaL gene in the genomes of P. syringae strains. However, although the promoter region of matE is only conserved in genomospecies 3 of this bacterial group, we showed that this gene also belongs to the Pto DC3000 HrpL regulon. We also demonstrated that the iaaL gene is transcribed both independently and as part of an operon with matE in this pathogen. Deletion of either the iaaL or the matE gene resulted in reduced fitness and virulence of Pto DC3000 in tomato plants. In addition, we used multicolor fluorescence imaging to visualize the responses of tomato plants to wild-type Pto DC3000 and to its ΔmatE and ΔiaaL mutants. Activation of secondary metabolism prior to the development of visual symptoms was observed in tomato leaves after bacterial challenges with all strains. However, the observed changes were strongest in plants challenged by the wild-type strain, indicating lower activation of secondary metabolism in plants infected with the ΔmatE or ΔiaaL mutants. Our results provide new evidence for the roles of non-type III effector genes belonging to the Pto DC3000 HrpL regulon in virulence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2016.
All research outputs
#13,445,400
of 22,824,164 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,273
of 3,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,736
of 266,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#17
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,824,164 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,191 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.