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A missense mutation of plastid RPS4 is associated with chlorophyll deficiency in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. pekinensis)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, June 2018
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Title
A missense mutation of plastid RPS4 is associated with chlorophyll deficiency in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. pekinensis)
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12870-018-1353-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaoyan Tang, Yiheng Wang, Yun Zhang, Shengnan Huang, Zhiyong Liu, Danli Fei, Hui Feng

Abstract

Plastome mutants are ideal resources for elucidating the functions of plastid genes. Numerous studies have been conducted for the function of plastid genes in barley and tobacco; however, related information is limited in Chinese cabbage. A chlorophyll-deficient mutant of Chinese cabbage that was derived by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment on isolated microspores showed uniformly pale green inner leaves and slow growth compared with that shown by the wild type "Fukuda 50' ('FT'). Genetic analysis revealed that cdm was cytoplasmically inherited. Physiological and ultrastructural analyses of cdm showed impaired photosynthesis and abnormal chloroplast development. Utilizing next generation sequencing, the complete plastomes of cdm and 'FT' were respectively re-mapped to the reference genome of Chinese cabbage, and an A-to-C base substitution with a mutation ratio higher than 99% was detected. The missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S4 led to valine substitution for glycine at residue 193. The expression level of rps4 was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR and found lower in than in 'FT'. RNA gel-blot assays showed that the abundance of mature 23S rRNA, 16S rRNA, 5S rRNA, and 4.5S rRNA significantly decreased and that the processing of 23S, 16S rRNA, and 4.5S rRNA was seriously impaired, affecting the ribosomal function in cdm. These findings indicated that cdm was a plastome mutant and that chlorophyll deficiency might be due to an A-to-C base substitution of the plastome-encoded rps4 that impaired the rRNA processing and affected the ribosomal function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Engineering 1 8%
Unknown 5 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2019.
All research outputs
#8,622,910
of 14,308,102 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#841
of 2,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,738
of 274,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,308,102 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,043 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,560 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them