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Influences of peer facilitation in general practice – a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, May 2018
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Title
Influences of peer facilitation in general practice – a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12875-018-0762-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tina Drud Due, Marius Brostrøm Kousgaard, Frans Boch Waldorff, Thorkil Thorsen

Abstract

Practice facilitation is increasingly used to support guideline implementation and practice development in primary care and there is a need to explore how this implementation approach works in real-life settings. We focus on a facilitation intervention from the perspective of the visited practices to gain a more detailed understanding of how peer facilitation influenced practices and how they valued the facilitation. The facilitation intervention was conducted in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark with the purpose of supporting the implementation of chronic disease management programmes. We carried out a qualitative study, where we observed 30 facilitation visits in 13 practice settings and interviewed the visited practices after their first and last visits. We then performed a thematic analysis. Most of the respondents reported that facilitation visits had increased their knowledge and skills as well as their motivation and confidence to change. These positive influences were ascribed to a) the facilitation approach b) the credibility and know-how associated with the facilitators' being peers c) the recurring visits providing protected time and invoking a sense of commitment. Despite these positive influences, both the facilitation and the change process were impeded by several challenges, e.g. competing priorities, heavy workload, problems with information technology and in some cases inadequate facilitation. Practice facilitation is a multifaceted, interactive approach that may affect participants in several ways. It is important to attune the expectations of all the involved actors through elaborate discussions of needs, capabilities, wishes, and approaches, and to adapt facilitation interventions according to an analysis of influential contextual conditions and change opportunities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 7 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 3 12%
Psychology 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 7 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,959,321
of 13,796,475 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,153
of 1,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,130
of 271,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
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