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A pilot study on the impact of known drug-drug interactions in cancer patients

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
A pilot study on the impact of known drug-drug interactions in cancer patients
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13046-015-0201-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvia Ussai, Riccardo Petelin, Antonio Giordano, Mario Malinconico, Donatella Cirillo, Francesca Pentimalli

Abstract

When a patient concomitantly uses two or more drugs, a drug-drug interaction (DDI) can possibly occur, potentially leading to an increased or decreased clinical effect of a given treatment. Cancer patients are at high risk of such interactions because they commonly receive multiple medications. Moreover, most cancer patients are elderly and require additional medications for comorbidities. Aim of this preliminary observational study was to evaluate the incidence of well known and established DDIs in a cohort of cancer outpatients undergoing multiple treatments. Anamnestic and clinical data were collected for 64 adult patients in the ambulatory setting with malignant solid tumors who were receiving systemic anticancer treatment. Patients also declared all drugs prescribed by other specialists or self-taken in the previous 2 weeks. DDIs were divided into two different groups: 'neoplastic DDIs' (NDDIs), involving antitumoral drugs, and 'not neoplastic DDIs' (nDDIs), involving all other classes of drugs. The severity of DDIs was classified as major, moderate and minor, according to the 'Institute for Pharmacological Research Mario Negri' definition. About 34 % of cancer outpatients within our cohort were prescribed/assumed interacting drug combinations. The most frequent major NDDIs involved the anticoagulant warfarin (33 % of total NDDIs) that, in association with tamoxifen, or capecitabine and paclitaxel, increased the risk of haemorrhage. About 60 % of nDDIs involved acetylsalicylic acid. Overall, 16 % of DDIs were related to an A-level strength of recommendation to be avoided. The lack of effective communication among specialists and patients might have a role in determining therapeutic errors. Our pilot study, although limited by a small cohort size, highlights the urgent need of implementing the clinical management of cancer outpatients with new strategies to prevent or minimize potential harmful DDIs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Researcher 7 11%
Other 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 16 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 21 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 22%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 19 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2015.
All research outputs
#6,059,877
of 11,342,964 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#155
of 592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,935
of 237,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#3
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,964 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 592 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.