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Epigenetic signature of preterm birth in adult twins

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Epigenetic signature of preterm birth in adult twins
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0518-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qihua Tan, Shuxia Li, Morten Frost, Marianne Nygaard, Mette Soerensen, Martin Larsen, Kaare Christensen, Lene Christiansen

Abstract

Preterm birth is a leading cause of perinatal mortality and long-term health consequences. Epigenetic mechanisms may have been at play in preterm birth survivors, and these could be persistent and detrimental to health later in life. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation profiling in adult twins of premature birth to identify genomic regions under differential epigenetic regulation in 144 twins with a median age of 33 years (age range 30-36). Association analysis detected three genomic regions annotated to the SDHAP3, TAGLN3 and GSTT1 genes on chromosomes 5, 3 and 22 (FWER: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04) respectively. These genes display strong involvement in neurodevelopmental disorders, cancer susceptibility and premature delivery. The three identified significant regions were successfully replicated in an independent sample of twins of even older age (median age 66, range 56-80) with similar regulatory patterns and nominal p values < 5.05e-04. Biological pathway analysis detected five significantly enriched pathways all explicitly involved in immune responses. We have found novel evidence associating premature delivery with epigenetic modification of important genes/pathways and revealed that preterm birth, as an early life event, could be related to differential methylation regulation patterns observable in adults and even at high ages which could potentially mediate susceptibility to age-related diseases and adult health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 9 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2018.
All research outputs
#8,769,910
of 15,923,161 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#456
of 845 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,231
of 278,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,923,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 845 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them