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High dietary zinc supplementation increases the occurrence of tetracycline and sulfonamide resistance genes in the intestine of weaned pigs

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, August 2015
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Title
High dietary zinc supplementation increases the occurrence of tetracycline and sulfonamide resistance genes in the intestine of weaned pigs
Published in
Gut Pathogens, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13099-015-0071-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wilfried Vahjen, Dominika Pietruszyńska, Ingo C. Starke, Jürgen Zentek

Abstract

Dietary zinc oxide is used in pig nutrition to combat post weaning diarrhoea. Recent data suggests that high doses (2.5 g/kg feed) increase the bacterial antibiotic resistance development in weaned pigs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the development of enterobacterial antibiotic resistance genes in the intestinal tract of weaned pigs. Weaned pigs were fed diets for 4 weeks containing 57 (low), 164 (intermediate) or 2425 (high) mg kg(-1) analytical grade ZnO. DNA extracts from stomach, mid-jejunum, terminal ileum and colon ascendens were amplified by qPCR assays to quantify copy numbers for the tetracycline (tetA) and sulfonamide (sul1) resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, the combined data (n = 336) showed that copy numbers for tetracycline and sulfonamide resistance genes were significantly increased in the high zinc treatment compared to the low (tetA: p value < 10(-6); sul1: p value = 1 × 10(-5)) or intermediate (tetA: P < 1.6 × 10(-4); sul1: P = 3.2 × 10(-4)) zinc treatment. Regarding the time dependent development, no treatment effects were seen 1 week after weaning, but significant differences between high and low/intermediate zinc treatments evolved 2 weeks after weaning. The increased number of tetA and sul1 copies was not confined to the hind gut, but was already present in stomach contents. The results of this study suggest that the use of high doses of dietary zinc beyond 2 weeks after weaning should be avoided in pigs due to the possible increase of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 99 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 19%
Student > Master 17 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 16 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 33%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 19 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 20 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,645,460
of 5,577,273 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#146
of 162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,594
of 194,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,577,273 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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