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Genomic characterization of colitis-associated colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, July 2018
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Title
Genomic characterization of colitis-associated colorectal cancer
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12957-018-1428-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hitoshi Kameyama, Masayuki Nagahashi, Yoshifumi Shimada, Yosuke Tajima, Hiroshi Ichikawa, Masato Nakano, Jun Sakata, Takashi Kobayashi, Sumana Narayanan, Kazuaki Takabe, Toshifumi Wakai

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is a chronic, idiopathic, repeated inflammatory disease. Colorectal cancer (CRC) that develops in patients with IBD is known as colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), but the underlying carcinogenic mechanism remains unclear. Genomic analysis of sporadic CRC has been well described based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. Using NGS, we compared all exons of 415 cancer-associated genes in patients in Japan and the USA who had CRC and found similar genomic alteration patterns among the two populations. However, genomic analysis of CAC has not been thoroughly investigated. The molecular pathogenesis of CAC shares many features with sporadic CRC, but there are distinct variations in the time and frequency of some alterations. Gene alterations in CAC are gradually being elucidated using genomic sequencing analyses. Some studies have shown that gene alteration patterns differ between UC and CD. The carcinogenesis of CAC depends on unique environmental, genetic, and immunological factors. In this review, we have discussed the differences in genomic alterations between sporadic CRC and CAC. NGS in patients with IBD has the potential to detect early CAC and to suggest therapeutic targets.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 24 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 28 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#14,623,847
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#1,311
of 1,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#241,014
of 280,331 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,557 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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