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Prospective plasma lipid profiling in individuals with and without depression

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, June 2018
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Title
Prospective plasma lipid profiling in individuals with and without depression
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12944-018-0796-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dietmar Enko, Wolfgang Brandmayr, Gabriele Halwachs-Baumann, Wolfgang J. Schnedl, Andreas Meinitzer, Gernot Kriegshäuser

Abstract

So far, studies on possible association of plasma lipid levels and depressive disorder are contradictory. This prospective work aimed at assessing a plasma lipid profile in individuals with major depression and healthy controls. In total, 94 patients with major depression and 152 healthy controls were included in this prospective study. After an overnight fasting state of 12 h they underwent blood drawing for triglyzerides (TG), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol measurements. All participants were evaluated in a clinical interview and filled out the self-rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scale to identify depressive symptomatology. Ninety-four patients with major depression showed significantly higher median (interquartile range) plasma TG levels (108.0 [75.8-154.1] vs. 84.0 [63.0-132.2] mg/dL, P = 0.014) and significantly lower HDL-cholesterol levels (55.0 [46.9-123.0] vs. 61.5 [47.4-72.6] mg/dL, P = 0.049) compared to 152 individuals without depression, respectively. Total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were observed slightly higher in patients with major depression. Significant positive correlation was found between TG, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations and the BDI-II score (p = 0.027, 0.048 and 0.018), and in tendency negative correlation between HDL-cholesterol levels and the BDI-II score (P = 0.091), respectively. Depressive individuals were found with adverse plasma lipid patterns of higher TG and lower HDL-cholesterol levels compared to healthy controls. On this basis, the authors would suggest the implementation of routine lipid measurements in order to stratify these patients by their cardiovascular risk.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Student > Master 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 9 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Psychology 4 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 11 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,683,937
of 13,153,703 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#788
of 952 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,769
of 268,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
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