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DNA methylation of imprinted genes at birth is associated with child weight status at birth, 1 year, and 3 years

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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54 Mendeley
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Title
DNA methylation of imprinted genes at birth is associated with child weight status at birth, 1 year, and 3 years
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13148-018-0521-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Gonzalez-Nahm, Michelle A. Mendez, Sara E. Benjamin-Neelon, Susan K. Murphy, Vijaya K. Hogan, Diane L. Rowley, Cathrine Hoyo

Abstract

This study assessed the associations between nine differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes in DNA derived from umbilical cord blood leukocytes in males and females and (1) birth weight for gestational age z score, (2) weight-for-length (WFL) z score at 1 year, and (3) body mass index (BMI) z score at 3 years. We conducted multiple linear regression in n = 567 infants at birth, n = 288 children at 1 year, and n = 294 children at 3 years from the Newborn Epigenetics Study (NEST). We stratified by sex and adjusted for race/ethnicity, maternal education, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, prenatal smoking, maternal age, gestational age, and paternal race. We also conducted analysis restricting to infants not born small for gestational age. We found an association between higher methylation of the sequences regulating paternally expressed gene 10 (PEG10) and anthropometric z scores at 1 year (β = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.34, 1.33; p = 0.001) and 3 years (β = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.37, 1.69; p value = 0.003) in males only. Higher methylation of the DMR regulating mesoderm-specific transcript (MEST) was associated with lower anthropometric z scores in females at 1 year (β = - 1.03; 95% CI - 1.60, - 0.45; p value = 0.001) and 3 years (β = - 1.11; 95% CI - 1.98, - 0.24; p value = 0.01). These associations persisted when we restricted to infants not born small for gestational age. Our data support a sex-specific association between altered methylation and weight status in early life. These methylation marks can contribute to the compendium of epigenetically regulated regions detectable at birth, influencing obesity in childhood. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Other 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2018.
All research outputs
#6,985,593
of 13,187,018 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#349
of 633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,162
of 267,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,187,018 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 633 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.