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Is the cross-over effect of a unilateral high-intensity leg extension influenced by the sex of the participants?

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, June 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Is the cross-over effect of a unilateral high-intensity leg extension influenced by the sex of the participants?
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13293-018-0188-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aude-Clémence M. Doix, Felix Wachholz, Natalie Marterer, Lorenz Immler, Kathrin Insam, Peter A. Federolf

Abstract

While performing a unilateral muscle contraction, electrical muscle activity also arises in the contralateral homologous muscle, muscle group, or limb. When the muscle contraction induces muscle fatigue, females show not only a greater resistance than males but also a reduced contralateral muscle activation. The study aimed at investigating whether, during a high-intensity 30-s unilateral maximal effort isometric leg extension exercise, the contralateral non-exercising limb (NEL) knee extensor muscle activation would differ between females and males. Twenty participants, 11 females (23.80 ± 2.15 years old) and 9 males (26.50 ± 2.45 years old), performed a unilateral 30-s exercise while surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) on both limbs. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured for both the exercising limb (EL) and the NEL before (MVC PRE) and after (MVC POST) the 30-s exercise to assess muscle fatigue. While both females and males exhibited muscle fatigue in the EL (p = 0.015), females exhibited a lower MVC reduction than males (p = 0.042), suggesting that females were less fatigued than males. Although no muscle fatigue, i.e., no MVC force reduction was found in the NEL for either group before and after the 30-s exercise, the muscle activity of the VL was found to be of greater magnitude during the MVC POST only for females (p = 0.047) while it remained unchanged for males. During the 30-s exercise, the force output of the EL decreased only for males (p = 0.029) while females showed a preservation of the force output (p > 0.05). The sEMG activity of the NEL during the 30-s unilateral exercise increased for both groups in all measured muscles (all p-values < 0.03). Likely, different underlying muscle fatigue mechanisms occurred in the EL between females and males. Yet, our findings suggest that the cross-over effect to the NEL during the 30-s exercise occurred in a similar fashion in both groups. The current study suggests that the contralateral muscle activation seen with a unilateral exercise is independent of the sex of individuals. Therefore, unilateral training or rehabilitation-based protocols would similarly impact females and males.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 22 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 8 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 22 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2018.
All research outputs
#6,678,654
of 13,232,126 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#124
of 240 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,618
of 266,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,232,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 240 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.