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Excessive sitting at work and at home: Correlates of occupational sitting and TV viewing time in working adults

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
220 Mendeley
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Title
Excessive sitting at work and at home: Correlates of occupational sitting and TV viewing time in working adults
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2243-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nyssa T. Hadgraft, Brigid M. Lynch, Bronwyn K. Clark, Genevieve N. Healy, Neville Owen, David W. Dunstan

Abstract

Recent evidence links sedentary behaviour (or too much sitting) with poorer health outcomes; many adults accumulate the majority of their daily sitting time through occupational sitting and TV viewing. To further the development and targeting of evidence-based strategies there is a need for identification of the factors associated with higher levels of these behaviours. This study examined socio-demographic and health-related correlates of occupational sitting and of combined high levels of occupational sitting/TV viewing time amongst working adults. Participants were attendees of the third wave (2011/12) of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study who worked full-time (≥35 h/week; n = 1,235; 38 % women; mean ± SD age 53 ± 7 years). Logistic and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted (separately for women and men) to assess cross-sectional associations of self-reported occupational sitting time (categorised as high/low based on the median) and also the combination of occupational sitting time/TV viewing time (high/low for each outcome), with a number of potential socio-demographic and health-related correlates. Higher levels of occupational sitting (>6 h/day) were associated with higher household income for both genders. Lower levels of occupational sitting were associated with being older (women only); and, for men only, having a blue collar occupation, having a technical/vocational educational attainment, and undertaking more leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). Attributes associated with high levels of both occupational sitting and TV viewing time included white collar occupation (men only), lower levels of LTPA (both genders), higher BMI (men), and higher energy consumption (women). Higher household income (both genders) and professional/managerial occupations (men only) were correlates of high occupational sitting time, relative to low occupational sitting time, while health-related factors (lower LTPA, higher BMI - men, and higher energy consumption - women) were associated with high levels of both occupational sitting and TV viewing time, relative to low occupational sitting and low TV viewing time. These findings suggest possible high-risk groups that may benefit from targeted interventions. Further research is needed on potentially modifiable environmental and social correlates of occupational sitting time, in order to inform workplace initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 220 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 219 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 15%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Researcher 15 7%
Student > Postgraduate 12 5%
Other 47 21%
Unknown 49 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 36 16%
Sports and Recreations 27 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 11%
Social Sciences 14 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Other 46 21%
Unknown 60 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,069,004
of 22,828,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,518
of 14,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,729
of 268,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#68
of 292 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,828,180 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,871 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 292 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.