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When, where and who? Accessing health facility delivery care from the perspective of women and men in Tanzania: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
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10 X users

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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146 Mendeley
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Title
When, where and who? Accessing health facility delivery care from the perspective of women and men in Tanzania: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3357-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thecla W. Kohi, Lilian T. Mselle, Justine Dol, Megan Aston

Abstract

Childbirth is a momentous event for women and their partners, yet women continue to die in childbirth worldwide, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. To reduce maternal mortality and increase the number of women delivering at health facilities, it is important to understand reasons why women who do deliver at health facilities chose to do so. Therefore, the objective of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of women and men on (i) when women go to the hospital; (ii) where women deliver; and (iii) who is involved in the delivery process related to accessing health facilities for delivery care in Tanzania. Using a qualitative design, four focus group discussions (n = 23) and semi-structured interviewers (n = 12) were held with postnatal women and men who were attending a postnatal clinic in the Lake Zone region of Tanzania. Data was analyzed using thematic coding. Women and men expressed factors that influenced when, where, and with whom they accessed health facilities for delivery care, with the quality of care received providing a significant influence. When decisions were made about going to the hospital, there were challenges that resulted in delayed treatment seeking; however, couples recognized the need to seek care earlier to prevent complications. Private hospitals were the preferred location for delivery with public hospitals and home deliveries with traditional birth attendants being less desirable. Both when and where delivery took place was influenced by the desire for better quality of care received as well as financial costs. Finally, there was mixed evidence on who was involved in decision making around delivery location from the perspective of women and men, but both groups expressed a preference for more male involvement during the delivery. Men and women show desire for women to delivery at health facilities; however, improvements are needed with respect to maternal care and humanizing the birth process in Tanzania. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on including men during the birth process, improving the quality of care received in public hospitals, and reducing the barriers to accessing health facilities for delivery care.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 146 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 16%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 10%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 22 15%
Unknown 49 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 18%
Social Sciences 14 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 1%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 57 39%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#2,462,711
of 24,407,785 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,020
of 8,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,775
of 333,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#49
of 217 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,407,785 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,239 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 217 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.