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Correlation of PET-CT nodal SUVmax with p16 positivity in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, September 2015
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Title
Correlation of PET-CT nodal SUVmax with p16 positivity in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0091-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica Clark, Caroline C. Jeffery, Han Zhang, Tim Cooper, Daniel A. O’Connell, Jeffrey Harris, Hadi Seikaly, Vincent L. Biron

Abstract

The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been rising in recent years. Given the clinical impact of HPV/p16 positivity in OPSCC, identifying surrogate markers of this disease early in the diagnostic work-up of these patients could improve patient care. Demographic, pathologic, staging and PET-CT data from patients diagnosed with OPSCC from 2009-2014 were obtained from a prospectively collected provincial cancer registry. Tumor HPV/p16 status was correlated to the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor and cervical nodes. Comparisons of means and multinomial regression models were used to determine associations between p16 status and SUVmax. A diagnostic odds ratio was calculated using a cut off value for predicting HPV/p16 positivity based on nodal SUVmax. PET-CT and HPV/p16 data was obtained for 65 patients treated surgically for OPSCC. Significantly higher nodal SUVmax was associated with HPV/p16 positive nodes (SUVmax 10.8 vs 7.9). No significant differences were seen between HPV/p16 positive vs negative primary tumor SUVmax (10.3 vs 13.7). In combination with other clinical parameters, higher nodal SUVmax was highly correlated with HPV/p16 positivity. Elevated nodal SUVmax is a significant predictor of HPV/p16 positive disease.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 12%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Mathematics 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2015.
All research outputs
#13,536,795
of 15,340,060 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#237
of 307 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,094
of 247,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 307 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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