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The influence of obesity on survival in early, high-risk breast cancer: results from the randomized SUCCESS A trial

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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69 Dimensions

Readers on

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116 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of obesity on survival in early, high-risk breast cancer: results from the randomized SUCCESS A trial
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13058-015-0639-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Widschwendter, Thomas WP Friedl, Lukas Schwentner, Nikolaus DeGregorio, Bernadette Jaeger, Amelie Schramm, Inga Bekes, Miriam Deniz, Krisztian Lato, Tobias Weissenbacher, Bernd Kost, Ulrich Andergassen, Julia Jueckstock, Julia Neugebauer, Elisabeth Trapp, Peter A. Fasching, Matthias W. Beckmann, Andreas Schneeweiss, Ines Schrader, Brigitte Rack, Wolfgang Janni, Christoph Scholz

Abstract

Obese breast cancer patients have worse prognosis than normal weight patients, but the level at which obesity is prognostically unfavorable is unclear. This retrospective analysis was performed using data from the SUCCESS A trial, in which 3754 patients with high-risk early breast cancer were randomized to anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapy with or without gemcitabine. Patients were classified as underweight/normal weight (body mass index (BMI) < 25.0), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), slightly obese (BMI 30.0-34.9), moderately obese (BMI 35.0-39.9) and severely obese (BMI ≥ 40.0), and the effect of BMI on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated (median follow-up 65 months). In addition, subgroup analyses were conducted to assess the effect of BMI in luminal A-like, luminal B-like, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor 2)-positive and triple-negative tumors. Multivariate analyses revealed an independent prognostic effect of BMI on DFS (p = 0.001) and OS (p = 0.005). Compared with underweight/normal weight patients, severely obese patients had worse DFS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.70, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.71-4.28, p < 0.001) and OS (HR 2.79, 95 % CI 1.63-4.77, p < 0.001), while moderately obese, slightly obese and overweight patients did not differ from underweight/normal weight patients with regard to DFS or OS. Subgroup analyses showed a similar significant effect of BMI on DFS and OS in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), but not in patients with other tumor subtypes. Severe obesity (BMI ≥ 40) significantly worsens prognosis in early breast cancer patients, particularly for triple-negative tumors. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02181101 . Registered September 2005.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 115 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 22 19%
Student > Master 16 14%
Researcher 15 13%
Other 11 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Other 22 19%
Unknown 20 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 3%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 20 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2017.
All research outputs
#2,761,497
of 15,049,563 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#417
of 1,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,616
of 248,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,049,563 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,608 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.