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Monitoring of serum lactate level during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adult in-hospital cardiac arrest

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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103 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Monitoring of serum lactate level during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adult in-hospital cardiac arrest
Published in
Critical Care, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-1058-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chih-Hung Wang, Chien-Hua Huang, Wei-Tien Chang, Min-Shan Tsai, Ping-Hsun Yu, Yen-Wen Wu, Kuan-Yu Hung, Wen-Jone Chen

Abstract

Serum lactate level may correlate with no-flow and low-flow status during cardiac arrest. Current guidelines have no recommended durations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before transition to the next strategy. We hypothesized that the lactate level measured during CPR could be associated with the survival probability and accordingly be useful in estimating the optimal duration for CPR. We conducted a retrospective observational study in a single medical centre and included adult patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest between 2006 and 2012. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to study the association of lactate level measured during CPR and outcomes. We used generalized additive models to examine the nonlinear effects of continuous variables and conditional effect plots to visualize the estimated survival probability against CPR duration. Of the 340 patients included in our analysis, 50 patients (14.7 %) survived to hospital discharge. The mean lactate level was 9.6 mmol/L and mean CPR duration was 28.8 min. There was an inverse near-linear relationship between lactate level and probability of survival to hospital discharge. A serum lactate level <9 mmol/L was positively associated with patient survival to hospital discharge (odds ratio 2.00, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-4.06). The optimal CPR duration may not be a fixed value but depend on other conditions. Serum lactate level measured during CPR could correlate with survival outcomes. A lactate level threshold of 9 mmol/L may be used as a reference value to identify patients with different survival probabilities and determine the optimal CPR durations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 103 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Other 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 17 31%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 63%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 December 2015.
All research outputs
#494,455
of 21,242,513 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#353
of 5,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,240
of 263,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,242,513 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,807 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,963 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them