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Propranolol reduces viability and induces apoptosis in hemangioblastoma cells from von Hippel-Lindau patients

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Propranolol reduces viability and induces apoptosis in hemangioblastoma cells from von Hippel-Lindau patients
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13023-015-0343-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Virginia Albiñana, Karina Villar Gómez de las Heras, Gemma Serrano-Heras, Tomás Segura, Ana Belén Perona-Moratalla, Mercedes Mota-Pérez, José María de Campos, Luisa María Botella

Abstract

Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare oncological disease with an incidence of 1:36,000, and is characterized by the growth of different types of tumors: hemangioblastomas in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina, renal carcinoma, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic serous cystadenoma, and endolymphatic sac tumors. These tumors do not express VHL protein (pVHL). pVHL ubiquitinates hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) protein for degradation by the proteasome; in the absence of VHL, HIF translocates to the nucleus to activate the expression of its target genes. Targeting VHL-derived tumors with drugs that have reduced side effects is urgent to avoid repeat CNS surgeries. Recent reports have shown that propranolol, a β-blocker used for the treatment of hypertension and other cardiac and neurological diseases, is the best option for infantile hemangioma (IH). Propranolol could be an efficient treatment to control hemangioblastoma growth in VHL disease because of its antiangiogenic effects demonstrated in IH and the hypothetical impact on HIF levels. HeLa 9X (HRE) hypoxia responsive element cell line and primary hemangioblastoma-derived cells were subjected to propranolol treatment and cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated. HIF1-α and Hif-2α expression after propranolol treatment was analyzed by western blotting. Quantitative PCR was performed to study the mRNA expression of HIF target genes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in culture supernatants by immunoassay. Propranolol downregulated HIF-dependent transcription in HeLa 9XHRE cells. Under hypoxic conditions, propranolol decreased the expression of HIF target genes in hemangioblastoma cells, which stopped proliferating and died following long-term treatment. These results suggests that propranolol treatment promoted reduced HIF protein expression and corresponding downregulation of HIF target genes, and inhibited cell proliferation in parallel with induction of cell death by apoptosis. Our results suggest that propranolol could reduce the growth of HIF-dependent tumors and may thus be a promising treatment to delay surgery in VHL patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 71 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 16 22%
Unknown 16 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Chemistry 4 5%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2019.
All research outputs
#3,790,450
of 14,860,150 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#444
of 1,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,493
of 248,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#4
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,860,150 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.