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Community attitudes on tuberculosis in Botswana: an opportunity for improving the National Tuberculosis Programme outcomes, 2011

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
Community attitudes on tuberculosis in Botswana: an opportunity for improving the National Tuberculosis Programme outcomes, 2011
Published in
BMC Research Notes, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3585-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Godfrey Musuka, Vonai Teveredzi, Lesego Busang, Innocent Chingombe, Panganai Makadzange, Setshwano Mokgweetsinyana, Ronald Ncube, Julita Maradzika, Carmillo Fungai Chinamasa, Themba Moeti

Abstract

The Botswana tuberculosis HIV Knowledge Attitude and Practice study sought to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of communities on TB and identify sources of their information on this disease and HIV. Specific objectives of the study were to: (a) collect baseline information on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices about tuberculosis treatment seeking and adherence behaviors in Botswana. (b) Identify barriers which discourage people who may have smear positive tuberculosis from testing and getting treatment (e.g. social stigma) and constraints which prevent them from initiating and completing treatment. Approximately 92% of respondents (n = 2029), reported that having TB was not something embarrassing, while about 97% (n = 2030) were not ashamed of having a family member with TB. Approximately 95% (n = 2030) expressed willingness to accommodate their relatives with TB at their homes or, work with TB patients (n = 2026). About 21% of the respondents however, believed in myths that TB infection is a result of either having sex with women who had miscarried (n = 2028), or food poisoning (n = 2031) while about 17% believed that TB infection is a result of sleeping with a widow or widower (n = 2031).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 13 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2018.
All research outputs
#9,646,629
of 17,806,415 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,264
of 3,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,759
of 286,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,806,415 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,727 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them