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Community health workers can improve child growth of antenatally-depressed, South African mothers: a cluster randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
301 Mendeley
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Title
Community health workers can improve child growth of antenatally-depressed, South African mothers: a cluster randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0606-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark Tomlinson, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Jessica Harwood, Ingrid M. le Roux, Mary O’Connor, Carol Worthman

Abstract

Maternal antenatal depression has long-term consequences for children's health. We examined if home visits by community health workers (CHW) can improve growth outcomes for children of mothers who are antenatally depressed. A cluster randomized controlled trial of all pregnant, neighbourhood women in Cape Town, South Africa. Almost all pregnant women (98 %, N = 1238) were recruited and assessed during pregnancy, two weeks post-birth (92 %) and 6 months post-birth (88 %). Pregnant women were randomized to either: 1) Standard Care (SC), which provided routine antenatal care; or 2) an intervention, The Philani Intervention Program (PIP), which included SC and home visits by CHW trained as generalists (M = 11 visits). Child standardized weight, length, and weight by length over 6 months based on maternal antenatal depression and intervention condition. Depressed mood was similar across the PIP and SC conditions both antenatally (16.5 % rate) and at 6 months (16.7 %). The infants of depressed pregnant women in the PIP group were similar in height (height-for-age Z scores) to the children of non-depressed mothers in both the PIP and the SC conditions, but significantly taller at 6 months of age than the infants of pregnant depressed mothers in the SC condition. The intervention did not moderate children's growth. Depressed SC mothers tended to have infants less than two standard deviations in height on the World Health Organization's norms at two weeks post-birth compared to infants of depressed PIP mothers and non-depressed mothers in both conditions. A generalist, CHW-delivered home visiting program improved infant growth, even when mothers' depression was not reduced. Focusing on maternal caretaking of infants, even when mothers are depressed, is critical in future interventions. ClinicalTrials.gov registration # NCT00996528 . October 15, 2009.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 301 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Unknown 294 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 53 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 16%
Researcher 36 12%
Student > Bachelor 22 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 6%
Other 55 18%
Unknown 68 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 53 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 47 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 43 14%
Social Sciences 35 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 3%
Other 35 12%
Unknown 79 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#7,223,059
of 22,829,083 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,401
of 4,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,807
of 274,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#31
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,829,083 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.