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A cultured approach to canine urothelial carcinoma: molecular characterization of five cell lines

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, September 2015
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Title
A cultured approach to canine urothelial carcinoma: molecular characterization of five cell lines
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40575-015-0028-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

SG Shapiro, DW Knapp, Matthew Breen

Abstract

Urothelial carcinoma (UC), also known as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), of the bladder is the most common neoplasm affecting the canine urogenital system. To facilitate study of the disease in vitro, cell line models have been established from primary tumor biopsies. Their resemblance to the primary disease, however, has not been well defined. In the present study, we evaluated five canine UC cell lines via oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (oaCGH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and gene expression analysis. Comparison of genome wide DNA copy number profiles of the cell lines with primary biopsy specimens revealed redundancies in genomic aberrations, indicating that the cell lines retain the gross genomic architecture of primary tumors. As in the primary tumors, gain of canine chromosomes 13 and 36 and loss of chromosome 19 were among the most frequent aberrations evident in the cell lines. FISH analysis revealed chromosome structural aberrations, including tandem duplications, bi-armed chromosomes, and chromosome fusions, suggesting genome instability during neoplastic transformation. Gene expression profiling highlighted numerous differentially expressed genes, including many previously shown as dysregulated in primary canine UC and human bladder cancer. Pathway enrichment analysis emphasized pathways suspected to be at the crux of UC pathogenesis, including xenobiotic and lipid compound metabolism. These data support valid use of the canine UC cell lines evaluated by confirming they provide an accurate and practical means to interrogate the UC at a molecular level. Moreover, the cell lines may provide a valuable model for furthering our understanding of aberrant metabolic pathways in UC development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 8 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,691,956
of 6,349,067 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#34
of 35 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,269
of 201,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,349,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 35 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 69.0. This one scored the same or higher as 1 of them.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.