↓ Skip to main content

A modified sentinel node and occult lesion localization (SNOLL) technique in non-palpable breast cancer: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A modified sentinel node and occult lesion localization (SNOLL) technique in non-palpable breast cancer: a pilot study
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13046-015-0230-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giulia Anna Follacchio, Francesco Monteleone, Paolo Anibaldi, Giuseppe De Vincentis, Silvia Iacobelli, Raffaele Merola, Valerio D’Orazi, Massimo Monti, Vittorio Pasta

Abstract

The spread of mammographic screening programs has allowed an increasing amount of early breast cancer diagnosis. A modern approach to non-palpable breast lesions requires an accurate intraoperative localization, in order to achieve a complete surgical resection. In addiction, the assessment of lymph node status is mandatory as it represents a major prognostic factor in these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reliability of a modified technical approach using a single nanocolloidal radiotracer to localize both sentinel node and breast occult lesion. Twenty-five patients with a single non-palpable breast lesions and clinically negative axilla were enrolled. In the same day of surgery, patients underwent intratumoral and peritumoral administration of (99m)Tc-labeled nanocolloid tracer under sonographic guidance. A lymphoscintigraphy was performed to localize the sentinel lymph node and its cutaneous projection was marked on the skin in order to guide the surgeon to an optimal incision. During surgery an hand-held gamma-detection probe was used to select the best surgical access route and to guide localization of both occult breast lesion and sentinel lymph node. After specimen excision, the surgical field was checked with the gamma-probe to verify the absence of residual sources of significant radioactivity, thereby ensuring a radical treatment in a single surgical session and minimizing normal tissue excision. Both targeted breast lesion and sentinel lymph node were localized and removed at the first attempt in every patients and histopathological diagnosis of malignancy was confirmed in 25/26 samples. Non-palpable lesions were included within the surgical margins in all patients and in all samples surgical margins were free from neoplastic infiltration thus avoiding any further reintervention. Only two patients showed metastatic involvement of sentinel lymph node. The modified sentinel node and occult lesion localization (SNOLL) technique performed with a single injection of nanocolloidal radiotracer has shown an excellent intraoperative identification rate of both non-palpable lesion and sentinel lymph node. This procedure offers, as opposed to standard techniques, an accurate, simple and reliable approach to the management of non-palpable breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 22%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Unspecified 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 14 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2015.
All research outputs
#8,792,398
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#292
of 598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,360
of 247,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#16
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 598 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,301 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.