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Determinants of cigarette smoking and smoking intensity among adult males in Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of cigarette smoking and smoking intensity among adult males in Ghana
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5872-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward Nketiah-Amponsah, Gloria Afful-Mensah, Samuel Ampaw

Abstract

In spite of the adverse health and financial implications of smoking, it still remains one of the leading causes of preventable diseases and deaths in the world. Key to discouraging the habit of smoking is knowledge of the drivers of smoking. In Ghana, though smoking behaviours are relatively more associated with adult males than youth and adolescents, studies on smoking behaviours of adult males are scant. This study, therefore, investigates the determinants of cigarette smoking and smoking intensity among adult males in Ghana. Data were obtained from the most recent Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted in 2014. Based on the 2014 GDHS, a negative binomial-logit hurdle model was estimated to explore the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics associated with cigarette consumption and smoking intensity among adult males in Ghana. To ensure robustness, separate estimations were performed for the respective logit and negative binomial models used in the two-part model. We find that men in lower socioeconomic category (poor and low education) have a higher likelihood to smoke. Also, age proved significant in explaining smoking behaviors in Ghana. Moreover, religion and region of residence are reported to affect cigarette consumption decision. Furthermore, we find that among the men who smoke, those between the ages of 44 and 60 years and have attained approximately primary education have a higher likelihood to smoke greater quantities of cigarette daily. Also, the smokers who reside in the Upper East and Upper West regions are reported to smoke more intensely than their counterparts in the Greater Accra region. Since smoking remains one of the major causes of diseases and deaths the world over, the current study provides recent empirical evidence based on a nationally representative sample for public health policies geared towards smoking reduction and ultimately cessation. This study suggests that public policies that promote higher educational attainment and improved incomes (wealth) are crucial in smoking reduction and cessation in Ghana.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 17 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 16%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 11%
Social Sciences 7 10%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#512,328
of 19,508,584 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#482
of 12,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,707
of 294,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,508,584 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.