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Ambulatory Care after Acute Kidney Injury: An Opportunity to Improve Patient Outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, October 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Ambulatory Care after Acute Kidney Injury: An Opportunity to Improve Patient Outcomes
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40697-015-0071-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel A. Silver, Stuart L. Goldstein, Ziv Harel, Andrea Harvey, Elizabeth J. Rompies, Neill K. Adhikari, Rey Acedillo, Arsh K. Jain, Robert Richardson, Christopher T. Chan, Glenn M. Chertow, Chaim M. Bell, Ron Wald

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an increasingly common problem among hospitalized patients. Patients who survive an AKI-associated hospitalization are at higher risk of de novo and worsening chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and death. For hospitalized patients with dialysis-requiring AKI, outpatient follow-up with a nephrologist within 90 days of hospital discharge has been associated with enhanced survival. However, most patients who survive an AKI episode do not receive any follow-up nephrology care. This narrative review describes the experience of two new clinical programs to care for AKI patients after hospital discharge: the Acute Kidney Injury Follow-up Clinic for adults (St. Michael's Hospital and University Health Network, Toronto, Canada) and the AKI Survivor Clinic for children (Cincinnati Children's Hospital, USA). MEDLINE, PubMed, ISI Web of Science. These two ambulatory clinics have been in existence for close to two (adult) and four (pediatric) years, and were developed separately and independently in different populations and health systems. The components of both clinics are described, including the target population, referral process, medical interventions, patient education activities, and follow-up schedule. Common elements include targeting patients with KDIGO stage 2 or 3 AKI, regular audits of the inpatient nephrology census to track eligible patients, medication reconciliation, and education on the long-term consequences of AKI. Despite the theoretical benefits of post-AKI follow-up and the clinic components described, there is no high quality evidence to prove that the interventions implemented in these clinics will reduce morbidity or mortality. Therefore, we also present a plan to evaluate the adult AKI Follow-up Clinic in order to determine if it can improve clinical outcomes compared to patients with AKI who do not receive follow-up care. Follow-up of AKI survivors is low, and this review describes two different clinics that care for patients who survive an AKI episode. We believe that sharing the experiences of the AKI Follow-up Clinic and AKI Survivor Clinic provide physicians with a feasible framework to implement their own clinics, which may help AKI patients receive outpatient care commensurate with their high risk status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 88 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Other 12 13%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 20 22%
Unknown 19 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 49%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Unspecified 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 24 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2018.
All research outputs
#3,021,909
of 17,687,978 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#69
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,568
of 260,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,687,978 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them